Can't Be Erased

In recent years, there has been an overwhelming push toward the erasure of important aspects of American history when it comes to issues of race and identity from school curricula across the country.

Since 2021, 44 states have introduced bills or taken steps toward restricting the teaching of so-called critical race theory (CRT), banning books, and or censoring the ways in which race can be discussed in classrooms. These unwarranted bills prevent schools from proactively teaching the root causes of systemic racism, tie the hands of teachers rather than support them, and hold students back from grappling with and helping to solve real challenges facing our society. And the threats continue.

By not teaching students the imperfect history of our country, we are failing to prepare them to be problem solvers and effective citizens in a multicultural society. Students need edification, not indoctrination — and America’s brutal truths cannot be swept under the rug in place of rosy fairy tales.

We are focused on taking a stand against the threats waged on schools and educators who dare to teach true American history in classrooms. Our campaign, “Can’t Be Erased” (#CantBeErased) highlights the importance of the various banned books by Black, LGBTQ+, and Latino authors, and how a continuous move towards repression is ultimately regressive education.

We’ve compiled a list of reading materials and resources that are useful in the fight against the censorship. Take a deeper dive below.

Banned Books by Black Authors

The 1619 Project by Nikole Hannah-Jones

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Invisible Man by Ralph Ellison

The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison

All American Boys by Jason Reynolds

Monday’s Not Coming by Tiffany D. Jackson

Banned Books by LGBTQ+ Authors

Flamer by Mike Curato

Gender Queer by Maia Kobabe

Gender Queer by Maia Kobabe

Melissa by Alex Gino

Melissa by Alex Gino

More Happy Than Not by Adam Silvera

This Book is Gay by James Dawson

This Book is Gay by James Dawson

We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson

We Are the Ants by Shaun David Hutchinson

Banned Books by Latino Authors

How the García Girls Lost Their Accents by Julia Alvarez

How the García Girls Lost Their Accents by Julia Alvarez

Always Running by Luis J. Rodriguez

Always Running by Luis J. Rodriguez

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros

Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina García

Dreaming in Cuban by Cristina García

Diverse Curriculum and Cultural Representation

@edtrust

Quality of representation is essential for diverse curriculum. Learn more at edtrust.org/booktool

♬ original sound - The Education Trust
@edtrust There has always been representation in curricula & that representation is predominantly White. In a study that looked at 300 books, we found that almost 1/2 of the people of color centered in these books were stereotyped. That's why we created a new book tool for representational balance to help curriculum publishers understand how people, groups & topics are represented in material. Check it out here: https://edtru.st/BookTool.#Teachers #teachersoftiktok#BookBans #representationmatters ♬ original sound - The Education Trust
@edtrust Cultural representation in grade school books matter. After examining hundreds of books, we determined that a book’s story or characters can be classified into 3 categories: Limited, partial, and complex. We created a new book tool for representational balance to help curriculum publishers understand how people, groups & topics are represented in material. Check it out here: edtrust.org/booktool #BannedBooks #BookTok #TeachersofTikTok ♬ original sound - The Education Trust

It's About Power, Not People

In a conversation about the critical race theory “debate” Ed Trust’s assistant director of higher education communications, Ameshia Cross, uncovers the impact of the increased censorship of Black History in schools with Florida Senator, Shevrin D. “Shev” Jones.